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General Italy Mardi Gras Venice

Is Venice Mardi Gras kaput again?

Venice carnival on Sunday, February 23, 2010
Wearing protective masks and suits at the Venice carnival on Sunday. The final two days of the event have been cancelled because of coronavirus. Photo by Manuel Silvestri/Reuters
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Photos courtesy of Carla Gambescia, author of La Dolce Vita University.

Venice, once an exotic East-meets-West Xanadu had by the turn of the 18th century long been a tourist honeypot with Europe’s best courtesans, elegant gambling salons and the extravagant festival of Carnevale.
Most famous of all revelers was Casanova whose infamous seductions were, indeed, an expression of Venetian decadence.
But then, abruptly, Carnevale was kaput. Napoleon, notorious killjoy that he was, decreed an end to all masquerade balls and public festivities when he took Venice as his own in 1797.
It was not until 1979 that the pipers piped and revelers once again reveled thanks to many young art students committed to reviving the craft of mask-making.

Read Carla Gambescia’s nostalgic article.



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King Cake or Chiacchiere?

The Mardi Gras or Carnival season officially begins on January 6th or the “Twelfth Night,” also known to Christians as the “Epiphany.” Epiphany comes from a Greek word that means “to show.” Jesus first showed himself to the three wisemen and to the world on this day. As a symbol of this Holy Day, a tiny plastic baby is placed inside each King Cake.

The King Cake tradition is thought to have been brought to New Orleans from France in 1870. A King Cake is an oval-shaped bakery delicacy, crossed between a coffee cake and a French pastry that is as rich in history as it is in flavor. It’s decorated in royal colors of PURPLE which signifies “Justice,” GREEN for “Faith,” and GOLD for “Power.”

These colors were chosen to resemble a jeweled crown honoring the Wise Men who visited the Christ Child on Epiphany. In the past such things as coins, beans, pecans, or peas were also hidden in each King Cake.

Today, a tiny plastic baby is the common prize. At a party, the King Cake is sliced and served. Each person looks to see if their piece contains the “baby.” If so, then that person is named “King” for a day and bound by custom to host the next party and provide the King Cake.

In Italy the history of Carnival is very ancient . The origins go back, in fact, to when the Saturnals were celebrated in ancient Rome, a festival very similar to today’s Carnival. During this period of banquets and popular festivals, in which all the social canons were overturned, one of the symbols of excess were the frictilia, sweets fried in pork fat, distributed to the crowd on the streets of the city. Apicius, one of the most refined gourmets of ancient times, describes the preparation of the small talk in his “De re coquinaria”: “Pancakes made with eggs and spelled flour, cut into morsels, fried in lard and then dipped in honey”.

Source: History of King Cakes

Source: La Cucina Italiana



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