Saint Lucy of Syracuse, Sicily 90th Anniversary Mass 2017

Syracuse (/ˈsɪrəˌkjuːs, -ˌkjuːz/; Italian: Syracuse, pronounced [siraˈkuːza]; Sicilian: Will/Seragusa; Latin: Syrācūsae St Lucy of Syracuse 90th Anniversary Mass 2017 Mae Galioto Webb President Saint Lucy Society   Saint Lucy (283 A.D. - 304 A.D.), also known as Saint Lucia or Santa Lucia, was a wealthy young Roman Christian martyr in Sicily who is venerated as a saint by the Roman Catholic Church, and Orthodox Catholic Church, and now by the Anglican Church and Lutheran Church. Her feast day in the Roman calendar is 13 December; with a name derived from Lux, Lucis meaning "Light", as she is the patron saint of those who are blind. According to the traditional story she was born of rich and noble parents about the year 283 A.D.. Her father was of Roman origin, but his early death left her dependent upon her mother, whose name, Eutychia, seems to indicate that she came of Greek stock. Like so many of the early martyrs, Lucy had consecrated her virginity to God, and she hoped to devote all her worldly goods to the service of the poor. Her mother was not so single-minded, but an occasion offered itself when Lucy could carry out her generous resolutions. The fame of the virgin-martyr Agatha, who had been executed fifty-two years before in the Decian persecution, was attracting numerous visitors to her relics at Catania, not fifty miles from Syracuse, and many miracles had been wrought through her intercession. Eutychia was therefore persuaded to make a pilgrimage to Catania, in the hope of being cured of a hemorrhage, from which she had been suffering for several years. There she was in fact cured, and Lucy, availing herself of the opportunity, persuaded her mother to allow her to distribute a great part of her riches among the poor. Victor P Musso, President American Italian Federation of the Southeast  

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